In the Matter of Reuben Hoppenstein, No. 2015-2918/A (N.Y. Sur. Mar. 31, 2017) the New York County Surrogate ruled as appropriate the distribution of a life insurance policy to a new trust which eliminated certain beneficiaries of the distributing trust. This distribution was made by a trustee vested with absolute discretionary power  by the terms

Michael Petro’s article in the Buffalo Law Journal  is an interesting  piece about  a relatively new provision of the law which permits us to end an “irrevocable” trust. It’s easy to decant a fine wine but not always so with an irrevocable trust.

Before the law was changed in 2011, ” irrevocable” meant just that.

Today’s Wall Street Journal contains a worthwhile but cautionary article about the pitfalls that can face even the most well-meaning executor. As you will see, a lot of the decisions an executor must make need to be made counterintuitively. The results of following a normal instinct may actually prove to be costly if not downright

Revisions to New York’s Estate Powers and Trusts Law (EPTL) enacted in 2008 were intended to correct inadvertent failures of a spouse to correct provisions to eliminate ex spouses as beneficiaries. The Matter of Suggs  involves just this type of situation. When the decedent and his spouse divorced, the court made provisions concerning the disposition